The Alarm Distress Baby Scale (ADBB)

Detect and evaluate the relational withdrawal of babies between 0 and 24 months.

HOW DOES THE ONLINE TRAINING IN THE USE OF ADBB WORK ?

The Alarm Distress Baby Scale (ADBB) is an observation tool to assess young children’s relational withdrawal before the age of three, i.e. before language appears. The sustained relational withdrawal is an important alarm signal from the child’s semiological repertoire.

The scale was built by Pr. Antoine Guedeney, with the help of the IPP’s PMI, to help observe the baby. It can be used, after training, in peadiatrician examination, home visiting, in development testing or observation at home, in clinics or in research.

Knowledge of the baby

This training will allow you to better evaluate the baby but also the effectivness of therapeutic interventions that can be offered. Savings in efficiency, time, professional and financial resources.

Make better decisions

This training will allow you to develop a team consensus and more broadly a network consensus to coordinate evaluations, decisions and case management.

Improve network practices

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A few things we’re great at

The course offers participants the opportunity to learn exceptional skills from home at a lower cost.

Well thought out courses

All lessons have been designed by experienced trainers with interactive teaching techniques that will help students achieve a good level of reliability in detecting and assessing infant relational withdrawal.

Train to make a quotation

For each training video presented you will have the opportunity to practice the rating with the scale and receive the reference score.

Selected Video Clips

Each video presented has been selected to help you progress.

Document sharing

Download training documents but also the possibility to share your videos for rating in live courses.

The ADBB Network

Quick contact, discussion and collaboration within the ADBB community and with trainers – experts through the training forum.

Train from anywhere you want

You only need to be connected to the internet to be able to follow the training.

Our Team

All experts in the evaluation of relational withdrawal in babies and also clinicians and researchers, they have several years of experience in the use of ADBB and for the training of health, mental health or childhood professionals.

Antoine Guedeney

Professeur de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescent

Alexandra Deprez

Docteur en psychologie clinique
Formatrice certifiée ADBB
Ingénieur pédagogique

Latest News

WAIMH 2018 Rome Conference under the sign of the ADBB

Last week the 16th International Conference on Baby Mental Health was held in Rome from 27 to 31 May 2018. The opportunity to update our knowledge of research using ADBB[…]

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Evaluating the baby’s point of view in the nursery

The Distress Alarm BabyScale is a tool for detecting and evaluating chronic relational withdrawal. Initially designed as a screening tool, it can be used in long-term clinical settings in a[…]

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Innovation in parenting clinics

The use of video as an intervention tool: The use of video as a parent/baby relationship intervention tool in parenting clinical practice is increasingly being adopted (Steele et al., 2014).[…]

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Client Testimonials

What the professionals who attended the training said.
All the testimonies are real but we chose to put only the first names. These testimonials relate to face-to-face training but we hope to do as well online :).

Do you sometimes have the feeling that you’re running into the same obstacles over and over again? Many of my conflicts have the same feel to them, like “Hey, I think I’ve been here before,

John Doe

Do you sometimes have the feeling that you’re running into the same obstacles over and over again? Many of my conflicts have the same feel to them, like “Hey, I think I’ve been here before,

John Doe

Do you sometimes have the feeling that you’re running into the same obstacles over and over again? Many of my conflicts have the same feel to them, like “Hey, I think I’ve been here before,

John Doe